Coastal Research

Wise management of coastal resources requires sound scientific understanding of the living and mineral resources of both land and water,  from the smallest upland streams through tributaries, bays, and estuaries to the broad expanses of the continental shelf. Learn here about efforts at VIMS to understand watershed dynamics and shoreline erosion, and to manage and conserve tidal and non-tidal wetlands, dunes, sandy beaches, and offshore mineral resources.

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Advisory Service Reports
  1. Norris, L., J. E. Perry, K. J. Havens, and Virginia Institute of Marine Science. Wetlands Program. 2002. A summary of methods for controlling Phragmites australis. Wetlands Program, [Gloucester Point, VA].
  2. Virginia Marine Resources Commission, and Virginia Institute of Marine Science. 1998. Guidelines for the establishment, use and operation of tidal wetland mitigation banks in Virginia. Virginia Marine Resources Commission, Newport News, Va.
  3. National Wetlands Inventory (U.S.). Region 5., and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Annapolis Field Office. 1986. Atlas of National Wetlands Inventory maps, Chesapeake Bay. National Wetlands Inventory, Region 5, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service ;Annapolis Field Office,, Newton Corner, Mass., Annapolis, Md.
  4. Hardaway, C. S., and G. L. Anderson. 1980. Shoreline erosion in Virginia. Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point, VA.
  5. Boon, J. D., M. E. Boule, and G. M. Silberhorn. 1977. Delineation of tidal wetlands boundaries in lower Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. VIMS, Gloucester Point, VA.
  6. Silberhorn, G. M. 1976. Tidal wetland plants of Virginia. Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point.
  7. Owen, D. W., L. M. Rogers, and M. H. Peoples. 1976. Shoreline situation report, cities of Chesapeake, Norfolk, and Portsmouth. Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point.
  8. Byrne, R. J., and G. L. Anderson. 1976. Shoreline erosion in Tidewater Virginia. Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point.
  9. Owen, D. W., M. H. Peoples, and G. L. Anderson. 1975. Shoreline situation report, Henrico, Chesterfield, and Richmond. Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point.
  10. Anderson, R. D., D. Garten, and T. F. Smolen. 1974. Legal symposium on wetlands : an executive summary. Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point, VA.
  11. Marcellus, K., and Virginia Institute of Marine Science. 1972. Coastal wetlands of Virginia. Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point.
  12. Virginia Institute of Marine Science. Wetlands Program. The Virginia wetlands report. Wetlands Program, Gloucester Point, VA.
Five Most Recent Journal Articles
  1. van Belzen, J., et al., 2017. Vegetation recovery in tidal marshes reveals critical slowing down under increased inundation. Nature Communications, 8. ARTN 15811 http://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms15811
  2. Schepers, L., et al., 2017. Spatio-temporal development of vegetation die-off in a submerging coastal marsh. Limnology and Oceanography, 62(1): p. 137-150. http://doi.org/10.1002/lno.10381
  3. Krauss, K.W., et al., 2017. Created mangrove wetlands store belowground carbon and surface elevation change enables them to adjust to sea-level rise. Scientific Reports, 7. ARTN 1030 http://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-01224-2
  4. Kornis, M.S., et al., 2017. Linking the Abundance of Estuarine Fish and Crustaceans in Nearshore Waters to Shoreline Hardening and Land Cover. Estuaries and Coasts, 40(5): p. 1464-1486. http://doi.org/10.1007/s12237-017-0213-6

Read a full list of VIMS-authored journal articles related to coastal research.