Global Change: VIMS Journal Articles

The following list is based on a search of VIMS-authored research articles from Thomson Reuters' Web of Science© using the title search terms climate or sea level and the keyword search terms carbon dioxide, global warming, climate change, acidification, or global change. The list is updated at least biannually.

  1. Van Dam, B.R., et al., 2018. Watershed-Scale Drivers of Air-Water CO2 Exchanges in Two Lagoonal North Carolina (USA) Estuaries. Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences, 123(1): p. 271-287.  https://doi.org/10.1002/2017jg004243
  2. Tatters, A.O., et al., 2018. Interactive effects of temperature, CO2 and nitrogen source on a coastal California diatom assemblage. Journal of Plankton Research, 40(2): p. 151-164.  https://doi.org/10.1093/plankt/fbx074
  3. Richardson, J.P., J.S. Lefcheck, and R.J. Orth, 2018. Warming temperatures alter the relative abundance and distribution of two co-occurring foundational seagrasses in Chesapeake Bay, USA. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 599: p. 65-74.  https://doi.org/10.3354/meps12620
  4. Pace, S.M., E.N. Powell, and R. Mann, 2018. Two-hundred year record of increasing growth rates for ocean quahogs (Arctica islandica) from the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, 503: p. 8-22.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jembe.2018.01.010
  5. Moomaw, W.R., et al., 2018. Wetlands In a Changing Climate: Science, Policy and Management. Wetlands, 38(2): p. 183-205.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s13157-018-1023-8
  6. Lefcheck, J.S., et al., 2018. Long-term nutrient reductions lead to the unprecedented recovery of a temperate coastal region. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 115(14): p. 3658-3662.  https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1715798115
  7. Irby, I.D., et al., 2018. The competing impacts of climate change and nutrient reductions on dissolved oxygen in Chesapeake Bay. Biogeosciences, 15(9): p. 2649-2668.  https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-2649-2018
  8. Hein, C.J., et al., 2018. Overcoming early career barriers to interdisciplinary climate change research. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews-Climate Change, 9(5). ARTN e530  https://doi.org/10.1002/wcc.530
  9. Hammer, K.J., et al., 2018. High temperatures cause reduced growth, plant death and metabolic changes in eelgrass Zostera marina. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 604: p. 121-132. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps12740
  10. Groner, M.L., et al., 2018. Dermal mycobacteriosis and warming sea surface temperatures are associated with elevated mortality of striped bass in Chesapeake Bay. Ecology and Evolution, 8(18): p. 9384-9397. https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.4462
  11. Glaspie, C.N., S.R. Jenkinson, and R.D. Seitz, 2018. Effects of Estuarine Acidification on an Oyster-Associated Community in New South Wales, Australia. Journal of Shellfish Research, 37(1): p. 63-72. https://doi.org/10.2983/035.037.0105
  12. Du, J.B., et al., 2018. Worsened physical condition due to climate change contributes to the increasing hypoxia in Chesapeake Bay. Science of the Total Environment, 630: p. 707-717. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.02.265
  13. Clavero, M., et al., 2018. Nowhere to swim to: climate change and conservation of the relict Dades trout Salmo multipunctata in the High Atlas Mountains, Morocco. Oryx, 52(4): p. 627-635. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0030605316001551
  14. Al Mukaimi, M.E., T.M. Dellapenna, and J.R. Williams, 2018. Enhanced land subsidence in Galveston Bay, Texas: Interaction between sediment accumulation rates and relative sea level rise. Estuarine Coastal and Shelf Science, 207: p. 183-193. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecss.2018.03.023
  15. Steinberg, D.K. and M.R. Landry, 2017. Zooplankton and the Ocean Carbon Cycle. Annual Review of Marine Sciences, Vol 9, 9: p. 413-444. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-marine-010814-015924
  16. Spackeen, J.L., et al., 2017. Interactive effects of elevated temperature and CO2 on nitrate, urea, and dissolved inorganic carbon uptake by a coastal California, USA, microbial community. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 577: p. 49-65. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps12243
  17. Rivest, E.B., et al., 2017. Lipid consumption in coral larvae differs among sites: a consideration of environmental history in a global ocean change scenario. Proceedings of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences, 284(1853). ARTN 20162825 https://doi.org/10.1098rspb.2016.2825
  18. Rao, V.P. and J.D. Milliman, 2017. Relict ooids off northwestern India: Inferences on their genesis and late Quaternary sea level. Sedimentary Geology, 358: p. 44-50. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sedgeo.2017.06.004
  19. Powell, E.N., et al., 2017. Can we estimate molluscan abundance and biomass on the continental shelf? Estuarine Coastal and Shelf Science, 198: p. 213-224. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecss.2017.09.012
  20. Orth, R.J., et al., 2017. Submersed Aquatic Vegetation in Chesapeake Bay: Sentinel Species in a Changing World. Bioscience, 67(8): p. 698-712. https://doi.org/10.1093/biosci/bix058
  21. Mullon, C., et al., 2017. Exploring future scenarios for the global supply chain of tuna. Deep-Sea Research Part Ii-Topical Studies in Oceanography, 140: p. 251-267. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dsr2.2016.08.004
  22. Meynard, C.N., et al., 2017. Climate-driven geographic distribution of the desert locust during recession periods: Subspecies' niche differentiation and relative risks under scenarios of climate change. Global Change Biology, 23(11): p. 4739-4749. https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.13739
  23. Manno, C., et al., 2017. Shelled pteropods in peril: Assessing vulnerability in a high CO2 ocean. Earth-Science Reviews, 169: p. 132-145. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.earscirev.2017.04.005
  24. Lefcheck, J.S., et al., 2017. Multiple stressors threaten the imperiled coastal foundation species eelgrass (Zostera marina) in Chesapeake Bay, USA. Glob Chang Biol. http://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.13623
  25. Zhu, Z., et al., 2016. A comparative study of iron and temperature interactive effects on diatoms and Phaeocystis antarctica from the Ross Sea, Antarctica. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 550: p. 39-51. http://doi.org/10.3354/meps11732
  26. Walters, D.C. and M.L. Kirwan, 2016. Optimal hurricane overwash thickness for maximizing marsh resilience to sea level rise. Ecology and Evolution, 6(9): p. 2948-2956. http://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.2024
  27. Phillips, R., et al., 2016. Fungal denitrification: Bipolaris sorokiniana exclusively denitrifies inorganic nitrogen in the presence and absence of oxygen. Fems Microbiology Letters, 363(4). ARTN fnw007
    http://doi.org/10.1093/femsle/fnw007
  28. Maynard, J., et al., 2016. Improving marine disease surveillance through sea temperature monitoring, outlooks and projections. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences, 371(1689). ARTN 20150208
    http://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2015.0208
  29. Kirwan, M.L., et al., 2016. Sea level driven marsh expansion in a coupled model of marsh erosion and migration. Geophysical Research Letters, 43(9): p. 4366-4373. http://doi.org/10.1002/2016gl068507
  30. Kirwan, M.L., et al., 2016. Overestimation of marsh vulnerability to sea level rise. Nature Climate Change, 6(3): p. 253-260. http://doi.org/10.1038/Nclimate2909
  31. Duffy, J.E., et al., 2016. Biodiversity enhances reef fish biomass and resistance to climate change. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 113(22): p. 6230-6235. http://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1524465113
    Cahill, B., et al., 2016. Interannual and seasonal variabilities in air-sea CO2 fluxes along the US eastern continental shelf and their sensitivity to increasing air temperatures and variable winds. Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences, 121(2): p. 295-311. http://doi.org/10.1002/2015jg002939
  32. Burge, C.A., et al., 2016. The Use of Filter-feeders to Manage Disease in a Changing World. Integrative and Comparative Biology, 56(4): p. 573-587. http://doi.org/10.1093/icb/icw048
  33. Boon, J.D. and M. Mitchell, 2016. Reply to: Houston, JR, 2016. Discussion of: Boon, JD and Mitchell, M., 2015. Nonlinear Change in Sea Level Observed at North American Tide Stations, Journal of Coastal Research, 31(6), 1295-1305. Journal of Coastal Research, 32(4), 983-987. Journal of Coastal Research, 32(4): p. 988-991. http://doi.org/10.2112/Jcoastres-D-16a-00001.1
  34. Blake, R.E. and J.E. Duffy, 2016. Influence of environmental stressors and grazer immigration on ecosystem properties of an experimental eelgrass community. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, 480: p. 45-53. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jembe.2016.03.007
  35. Yang, Q.C., et al., 2015. Hydrological Responses to Climate and Land-Use Changes Along the North American East Coast: A 110-Year Historical Reconstruction. Journal of the American Water Resources Association, 51(1): p. 47-67. http://doi.org/10.1111/jawr.12232
  36. Weng, K.C., et al., 2015. Umbrella species in marine systems: using the endangered humphead wrasse to conserve coral reefs. Endangered Species Research, 27(3): p. 251-263. http://doi.org/10.3354/esr00663
  37. Weng, K.C., et al., 2015. Fishery management, development and food security in the Western and Central Pacific in the context of climate change. Deep-Sea Research Part Ii-Topical Studies in Oceanography, 113: p. 301-311. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.dsr2.2014.10.025
  38. Hofmann, L.C., et al., 2015. CO2 and inorganic nutrient enrichment affect the performance of a calcifying green alga and its noncalcifying epiphyte. Oecologia, 177(4): p. 1157-1169. http://doi.org/10.1007/s00442-015-3242-5
  39. Hobday, A.J., et al., 2015. Impacts of climate change on marine top predators: Advances and future challenges. Deep-Sea Research Part Ii-Topical Studies in Oceanography, 113: p. 1-8. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.dsr2.2015.01.013
  40. Hobday, A.J., et al., 2015. Reconciling conflicts in pelagic fisheries under climate change. Deep-Sea Research Part Ii-Topical Studies in Oceanography, 113: p. 291-300. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.dsr2.2014.10.024
  41. Del Raye, G. and K.C. Weng, 2015. An aerobic scope-based habitat suitability index for predicting the effects of multi-dimensional climate change stressors on marine teleosts. Deep-Sea Research Part Ii-Topical Studies in Oceanography, 113: p. 280-290. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.dsr2.2015.01.014
  42. Walters, D., et al., 2014. Interactions between barrier islands and backbarrier marshes affect island system response to sea level rise: Insights from a coupled model. Journal of Geophysical Research-Earth Surface, 119(9): p. 2013-2031. http://doi.org/10.1002/2014jf003091
  43. Varnell, L.M., 2014. Shoreline Energy and Sea Level Dynamics in Lower Chesapeake Bay: History and Patterns. Estuaries and Coasts, 37(2): p. 508-523. http://doi.org/10.1007/s12237-013-9672-6
  44. Smith, W.O., et al., 2014. The effects of changing winds and temperatures on the oceanography of the Ross Sea in the 21st century. Geophysical Research Letters, 41(5): p. 1624-1631. http://doi.org/10.1002/2014gl059311
  45. Smith, W.O., et al., 2014. The Oceanography and Ecology of the Ross Sea. Annual Review of Marine Science, Vol 6, 6: p. 469-487. http://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-marine-010213-135114
  46. Moore, K.A., E.C. Shields, and D.B. Parrish, 2014. Impacts of Varying Estuarine Temperature and Light Conditions on Zostera marina (Eelgrass) and its Interactions with Ruppia maritima (Widgeongrass). Estuaries and Coasts, 37(1): p. S20-S30. http://doi.org/10.1007/s12237-013-9667-3
  47. Kennish, M.J., M.J. Brush, and K.A. Moore, 2014. Drivers of Change in Shallow Coastal Photic Systems: An Introduction to a Special Issue. Estuaries and Coasts, 37(1): p. S3-S19. http://doi.org/10.1007/s12237-014-9779-4
  48. Zhang, K.Q., et al., 2013. Comparison of three methods for estimating the sea level rise effect on storm surge flooding. Climatic Change, 118(2): p. 487-500. http://doi.org/10.1007/S10584-012-0645-8
  49. Waldbusser, G.G., E.N. Powell, and R. Mann, 2013. Ecosystem effects of shell aggregations and cycling in coastal waters: an example of Chesapeake Bay oyster reefs. Ecology, 94(4): p. 895-903.
  50. Sobocinski, K.L., et al., 2013. Historical Comparison of Fish Community Structure in Lower Chesapeake Bay Seagrass Habitats. Estuaries and Coasts, 36(4): p. 775-794. http://doi.org/10.1007/S12237-013-9586-3
  51. Sailley, S.F., et al., 2013. Carbon fluxes and pelagic ecosystem dynamics near two western Antarctic Peninsula Adelie penguin colonies: an inverse model approach. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 492: p. 253-272. http://doi.org/10.3354/meps10534
  52. Ruckelshaus, M., S. C. Doney, et al. 2013. Securing ocean benefits for society in the face of climate change. Marine Policy 40: 154-159. doi 10.1016/J.Marpol.2013.01.009
  53. Zhang, K. Q., Y. P. Li, et al. 2013. Comparison of three methods for estimating the sea level rise effect on storm surge flooding. Climatic Change 118(2): 487-500. doi 10.1007/S10584-012-0645-8
  54. Waldbusser, G. G., E. N. Powell, et al. 2013. Ecosystem effects of shell aggregations and cycling in coastal waters: an example of Chesapeake Bay oyster reefs. Ecology 94(4): 895-903.
  55. Sobocinski, K. L., R. J. Orth, et al. 2013. Historical Comparison of Fish Community Structure in Lower Chesapeake Bay Seagrass Habitats. Estuaries and Coasts 36(4): 775-794. doi 10.1007/S12237-013-9586-3
  56. Duffy, J. E., L. A. Amaral-Zettler, et al. 2013. Envisioning a Marine Biodiversity Observation Network. Bioscience 63(5): 350-361. doi 10.1525/Bio.2013.63.5.8
  57. Goni, M. A., A. E. O'Connor, et al. 2013. Distribution and sources of organic matter in surface marine sediments across the North American Arctic margin. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans 118(9): 4017-4035. doi 10.1002/Jgrc.20286
  58. Sailley, S. F., H. W. Ducklow, et al. 2013. Carbon fluxes and pelagic ecosystem dynamics near two western Antarctic Peninsula Adelie penguin colonies: an inverse model approach. Marine Ecology Progress Series 492: 253-272. doi 10.3354/Meps10534
  59. Steinberg, D. K., M. W. Lomas, et al. 2012. Long-term increase in mesozooplankton biomass in the Sargasso Sea: Linkage to climate and implications for food web dynamics and biogeochemical cycling. Global Biogeochemical Cycles 26. doi 10.1029/2010gb004026
  60. Doney, S. C., M. Ruckelshaus, et al. 2012. Climate Change Impacts on Marine Ecosystems. Annual Review of Marine Science, Vol 4 4: 11-37. doi 10.1146/Annurev-Marine-041911-111611
  61. Canuel, E. A., S. S. Cammer, et al. 2012. Climate Change Impacts on the Organic Carbon Cycle at the Land-Ocean Interface. Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol 40 40: 685-+. doi 10.1146/Annurev-Earth-042711-105511
  62. Sun, S. C., X. W. Wu, et al. 2011. A brown-world cascade in the dung decomposer food web of an alpine meadow: effects of predator interactions and warming. Ecological Monographs 81(2): 313-328.
  63. Munroe, D. M., E. N. Powell, et al. 2011. A Modelling Approach to Understanding Surf Clam (Spisula Solidissima) Mortality Patterns and Population Distribution Relative to Climate Change. Journal of Shellfish Research 30(2): 536-536.
  64. Tang, K. W., T. G. Nielsen, et al. 2011. Metazooplankton community structure, feeding rate estimates, and hydrography in a meltwater-influenced Greenlandic fjord. Marine Ecology-Progress Series 434: 77-99. doi 10.3354/Meps09188
  65. Wu, X. W., J. E. Duffy, et al. 2011. A brown-world cascade in the dung decomposer food web of an alpine meadow: effects of predator interactions and warming. Ecological Monographs 81(2): 313-328.
  66. Lomas, M. W., D. K. Steinberg, et al. 2010. Increased ocean carbon export in the Sargasso Sea linked to climate variability is countered by its enhanced mesopelagic attenuation. Biogeosciences 7(1): 57-70.
  67. Balazik, M. T., G. C. Garman, et al. 2010. Changes in age composition and growth characteristics of Atlantic sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus) over 400 years. Biology Letters 6(5): 708-710. doi 10.1098/Rsbl.2010.0144
  68. Gerber, T. P., L. F. Pratson, et al. 2010. The influence of sea level and tectonics on Late Pleistocene through Holocene sediment storage along the high-sediment supply Waipaoa continental shelf. Marine Geology 270(1-4): 139-159. doi 10.1016/J.Margeo.2009.10.002
  69. Feng, Y., C. E. Hare, et al. 2010. Interactive effects of iron, irradiance and CO2 on Ross Sea phytoplankton. Deep-Sea Research Part I-Oceanographic Research Papers 57(3): 368-383. doi 10.1016/J.Dsr.2009.10.013
  70. Ducklow, H. W., S. C. Doney, et al. 2009. Contributions of Long-Term Research and Time-Series Observations to Marine Ecology and Biogeochemistry. Annual Review of Marine Science 1: 279-302. doi 10.1146/Annurev.Marine.010908.163801
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  73. Moore, K. A. and J. C. Jarvis 2008. Environmental Factors Affecting Recent Summertime Eelgrass Diebacks in the Lower Chesapeake Bay: Implications for Long-term Persistence. Journal of Coastal Research 55(sp1): 135-147.
  74. Day, J. W., R. R. Christian, et al. 2008. Consequences of climate change on the ecogeomorphology of coastal wetlands. Estuaries and Coasts 31(3): 477-491. doi 10.1007/S12237-008-9047-6
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  77. Ducklow, H. W., K. Baker, et al. 2007. Marine pelagic ecosystems: The West Antarctic Peninsula. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences 362(1477): 67-94.
  78. Duffy, J. E. and J. J. Stachowicz 2006. Why biodiversity is important to oceanography: potential roles of genetic, species, and trophic diversity in pelagic ecosystem processes. Marine Ecology-Progress Series 311: 179-189.
  79. Day, F. P., D. B. Stover, et al. 2006. Rapid root closure after fire limits fine root responses to elevated atmospheric CO2 in a scrub oak ecosystem in central Florida, USA. Global Change Biology 12(6): 1047-1053.
  80. Southworth, M. and R. Mann 2004. Decadal scale changes in seasonal patterns of oyster recruitment in the Virginia sub estuaries of the Chesapeake Bay. Journal of Shellfish Research 23(2): 391-402.
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