2003 After Hours Lectures

For information on upcoming lectures, visit the After Hours web pages. Funding for this series is provided by the CBNERRVA and CCRM programs at VIMS and the VIMS Communications Department.

Access information on lectures from other years here:

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Bald Eagles of Chesapeake Bay

(November 20, 2003) Dr. Bryan Watts explores the ecology, habitats, behavior, and recovery of bald eagles in lower Chesapeake Bay. Watts, who directs the Center for Conservation Biology (CCB) at the College of William & Mary, is an expert in avian community ecology, habitat dynamics, and conservation of rare and endangered species and communities.

Deep-Sea Squids and the Nature of Natural History

(October 30, 2003) Dr. Mike Vecchione, an adjunct Professor in VIMS' Dept of Fisheries Science and world expert on deep-sea squid, will explore the challenges of studying deep- and mid-water marine life, and the knowledge that can be gained from these little-known creatures.

The Shark Chronicles: A Scientist's View of the Consummate Predator

(August 28, 2003) Join world-renown shark expert Dr. Jack Musick as he explores the world of sharks and debunks many of the myths surrounding the biology and ecology of this often misunderstood animal.

Jellyfish in Chesapeake Bay and Beyond

(July 31, 2003) Join Dr. Deb Steinberg to learn how there's much more to jellies than "the sting." Steinberg will explore the biology, ecology, and behavior of jellyfish and other gelatinous ocean drifters in the Chesapeake Bay and the open sea.

Underwater Grasslands: Chesapeake Bay's Hidden Habitat

(June 26, 2003) Dr. Ken Moore will explore the important role of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in Chesapeake Bay ecology, describe the factors behind their long-term decline, show the methods used to determine their current and historical abundances, and highlight recent efforts to bring them back.

Beautiful Swimmers: Blue Crabs of the Chesapeake
(May 22, 2003) Jacques van Montfrans will examine the biology, ecology, and life history of one of Chesapeake Bay's most important commercial and recreational shellfish—the blue crab Callinectes sapidus.
Sea Turtles of Chesapeake Bay

(April 24, 2003) Ph.D. student Kate Mansfield inaugurates VIMS' new public lecture series by exploring the natural history of sea turtles in Chesapeake Bay. Mansfield runs the day-to-day operations of the VIMS Sea Turtle Stranding Program. VIMS has served as the Commonwealth's center for the monitoring, study, and conservation of endangered and threatened sea turtles within Virginia's waters since 1979.